Literature Essay Definition And Examples

A Literary Analysis Essay Example and More

A literature essay definition

As a rule, most sources have the following definition of literary essays as pieces of academic writing. Thus, the literary essay definition is of a relatively short composition aiming to scrutinize and investigate the structure, meaning, and value of a certain literary piece.

To muster a brilliant literary essay you have to possess two key traits – a profound knowledge of a particular work and creative thinking. Being specific (unlike in reviews) is absolutely necessary as well.

Literary essays as your personal experience

After grasping the meaning of what is a literary analysis essay, you have to read the piece of literature in question several times. Yes, you’ve got it just right – knowing all ins and outs of a literary creation is more than obligatory. It’s a must-have if you want to succeed.

Mind that downloading a couple of literary analysis essay examples is a great idea. Care to draw up a literary analysis essay outline to have your whole work structured and organized well. Now, here comes the most important part.

Writing literary essays is everything about expressing your own point of view. Therefore, you have to be well-prepared in terms of additional information, analysis, and researches of other people. Combine this knowledge and frame it with your own opinion and meditations. Be sure – it will be difficult. Why exactly?

Because it is not a one-passage review you have to craft but a complex investigation of a literary work. So, you have to be original, innovative, and at the same time entertaining as well as educative. You may want to add a little bit of humor or drama (where applicable).

How to structure your work right? – 3 key elements

Now take a look at a literary analysis essay sample available at our site. You see that there is an Introduction, Main Body, and a Conclusion. Let’s find out what are their most crucial features.

INTRODUCTION

Start your first paragraph with a so-called Hook. Note how it’s done in a sample literary analysis essay provided at our site. It grabs readers’ attention so you’d really like using a thought-provoking question, a call to action, a dialogue or even a short story.

When you’re done with captivating your audience, concentrate them on the literary work under analysis, its author, and some basic information.

Finally, give a solid Thesis. Present something arguable and contradictory. Something you are going to prove or confute.

MAIN BODY

Remember: One paragraph bears one thought. Consult a literary analysis essay example for visual hints on how it’s actually done. The main goal of the Main Body is to prove your Thesis right or wrong. Give solid Evidence.

Do it by presenting your own ideas, backing them up with various quotes and works of other scholar, giving comments on such issues as the plot, historical and social background, author’s beliefs, etc.

CONCLUSIONS

Give your readers something to think of. Something unexpected, a little bit provocative. An ending with a twist or a mystery will do absolutely fantastic. An academic “aftertaste” is what you need to evoke.

…and when time is desperately lacking

As you can see, presenting a proper essay is both difficult and time-taking. You have not only to write an essay but to read an original literary piece several times, analyze it, research, make notes and so on.

Although a literary essay example will help you a lot, it might not be enough. It all takes time. And sometimes – especially at the end of the term – you have it not. Therefore, turning to UK and US experts of www.SameDayEssay.com will prove useful. Delegate parts of the writing process to specialists, consult them live and cope with all tasks at hand peerlessly.

Order now

Essay, an analytic, interpretative, or critical literary composition usually much shorter and less systematic and formal than a dissertation or thesis and usually dealing with its subject from a limited and often personal point of view.

Read More on This Topic

nonfictional prose: The essay

In modern literatures, the category of nonfictional prose that probably ranks as the most important both in the quantity and in the quality of its practitioners is the essay.

READ MORE

Some early treatises—such as those of Cicero on the pleasantness of old age or on the art of “divination,” Seneca on anger or clemency, and Plutarch on the passing of oracles—presage to a certain degree the form and tone of the essay, but not until the late 16th century was the flexible and deliberately nonchalant and versatile form of the essay perfected by the French writer Michel de Montaigne. Choosing the name essai to emphasize that his compositions were attempts or endeavours, a groping toward the expression of his personal thoughts and experiences, Montaigne used the essay as a means of self-discovery. His Essais, published in their final form in 1588, are still considered among the finest of their kind. Later writers who most nearly recall the charm of Montaigne include, in England, Robert Burton, though his whimsicality is more erudite, Sir Thomas Browne, and Laurence Sterne, and in France, with more self-consciousness and pose, André Gide and Jean Cocteau.

At the beginning of the 17th century, social manners, the cultivation of politeness, and the training of an accomplished gentleman became the theme of many essayists. This theme was first exploited by the Italian Baldassare Castiglione in his Il libro del cortegiano (1528; The Book of the Courtier). The influence of the essay and of genres allied to it, such as maxims, portraits, and sketches, proved second to none in molding the behavior of the cultured classes, first in Italy, then in France, and, through French influence, in most of Europe in the 17th century. Among those who pursued this theme was the 17th-century Spanish Jesuit Baltasar Gracián in his essays on the art of worldly wisdom.

Keener political awareness in the 18th century, the age of Enlightenment, made the essay an all-important vehicle for the criticism of society and religion. Because of its flexibility, its brevity, and its potential both for ambiguity and for allusions to current events and conditions, it was an ideal tool for philosophical reformers. The Federalist Papers in America and the tracts of the French Revolutionaries are among the countless examples of attempts during this period to improve the human condition through the essay.

The genre also became the favoured tool of traditionalists of the 18th and 19th centuries, such as Edmund Burke and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, who looked to the short, provocative essay as the most potent means of educating the masses. Essays such as Paul Elmer More’s long series of Shelburne Essays (published between 1904 and 1935), T.S. Eliot’s After Strange Gods (1934) and Notes Towards the Definition of Culture (1948), and others that attempted to reinterpret and redefine culture, established the genre as the most fitting to express the genteel tradition at odds with the democracy of the new world.

Whereas in several countries the essay became the chosen vehicle of literary and social criticism, in other countries the genre became semipolitical, earnestly nationalistic, and often polemical, playful, or bitter. Essayists such as Robert Louis Stevenson and Willa Cather wrote with grace on several lighter subjects, and many writers—including Virginia Woolf, Edmund Wilson, and Charles du Bos—mastered the essay as a form of literary criticism.

0 thoughts on “Literature Essay Definition And Examples”

    -->

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *